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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

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TABLE 4
Projected Enrollments and Financial Requirements up to 1970 for UNESCO Regional Educational Targets, by Regions
	1965	Percent	1970	Percent	Average Annual Rate of Increase (Percent)
AFRICA					
First level: enrollment	15,279		20,378		5.93
Participation rate (000)		51		71	
Second level: enrollment	1,833.5		3,390		13.08
Participation rate (000)		9		15	
Third level: enrollment	46		80		11.71
Participation rate (000)		0.35		0.55	
Total expenditures (U.S. $ mil)	1,139		1,701		8.35
GNP (U.S. $ mil)	19,694		24,413		4.39
Percentage of GNP		5.78		6.96	
LATIN AMERICA					
First level: enrollment	34,721		43,438		4.58
Participation rate (000)		91		100	
Second level: enrollment	6,230		11,457		12.96
Participation rate (000)		22		34	
Third level: enrollment	665		905		6.35
Participation rate (000)		3.4		4	
Total expenditures (U.S. $ mil)	3,219		4,937		9
GNP (U.S. $ mil)	71,130		90,782		5
Percentage of GNP		4.52		5.43	
ASIA					
First level: enrollment	110,368		148,716		6.15
Participation rate (000)		63		74	
Second level: enrollment	14,545		23,064		9.66
Participation rate (000)		15		19	
Third level: enrollment	2,206		3,320		7.86
Participation rate (000)		3.4		4.1	
Total expenditures (U.S. $ mil)	3,261		4,803		8.05
GNP (U.S. $ mil)	88,319		112,719		5
Percentage of GNP		3.69		4.26	
Source: (12, Appendix 25).
ing of a substantial proportion of income into education. The poor countries have a wide range of options open to them.
OFFICIAL EDUCATIONAL GOALS
The broad objectives of the future development of education in the LDC's are well expressed in the final resolution and statement of the Meeting ofever, as shown in Figure 2, there is no relationship at all if we consider only those countries with per capita GNP between $700J The share of educational expenditures in the national incomes of the poorest countries (those with per capita incomes below $250) range very widely indeed-frorn 1.5 percent to 8.5 percent. Coupled with the evidence of an upward shift over time in the share of educational expenditures in most countries, these figures indicate that in no sense can low income be considered an immovable barrier to the channel-